Leitz

They are a small estate of 5.8 hectares. Extraordinarily aromatic, vigorous wines. They have the lusty vitality of wines that were never racked; Leitz bottles them off the gross lees from the casks in which they fermented. “A lot of people talk about ‘yeast-contact’ but I think I’m the only one who actually does it.” They have a remarkable reconciliation of weight, solidity and buoyancy. They tend to run stony, as is the Rheingau type—when it’s true! And they are fastidiously specific in their site characteristics.

They are intensely fragrant, as though they wished to convince you of something. They are like Wachau wines; they crave oxygen, and they do show their best when ice cold. They are, to my way of thinking, the most exciting wines currently made in the Rheingau and they didn’t get there with bazillions of yen or with mega-technology or with a Kantian superstructure of philosophy: Just a man, his dog, and their wines.

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Producer website

Available Wines

Leitz 2010 Rüdesheimer Magdalenenkreuz Riesling Spätlese

The Magdalenenkreuz Vineyard is located on the hillsides banks of the town of Rüdesheim. The vineyard starts at an elevation of 100 meters and rises to 165 meters in a relatively short distance. It lies directly below the Rüdesheimer Kirchenpfad and Klosterberg. On the top of this hill lies the historic Abbey of St. Hildegard. It was the church that controlled the vineyards for hundreds of years, hence the religious names: Magdalenenkreuz translates to Mary of the Cross. The vineyard has many different soil types, but it can primarily be described as a sandy loam. This wine is also technically at Auslese level ripeness, but bottled as a Spätlese anyway.

Leitz 2013 Rüdesheimer Magdalenenkreuz Riesling Spätlese

The Magdalenenkreuz Vineyard is located on the hillsides banks of the town of Rüdesheim. The vineyard starts at an elevation of 100 meters and rises to 165 meters in a relatively short distance. It lies directly below the Rüdesheimer Kirchenpfad and Klosterberg. On the top of this hill lies the historic Abbey of St. Hildegard. It was the church that controlled the vineyards for hundreds of years, hence the religious names: Magdalenenkreuz translates to Mary of the Cross. The vineyard has many different soil types, but it can primarily be described as a sandy loam. This wine is also technically at Auslese level ripeness, but bottled as a Spätlese anyway.